California Association of Social Rehabilitation Agencies

CASRA 2021 Spring Virtual Conference

Event Program

DAYS:
May 04  -   May 06  -   May 12

May 04, 2021

Title Speaker Description Goals CEU

The CASRA Story: 50 Years in the Making
(09:00 AM - 10:00 AM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Betty Dahlquist, MSW CPRP, Executive Director, California Association of Social Rehabilitation Agencies, Martinez, CA.

Through the past 50 years, and continuing to this day, CASRA and its member agencies are pioneers and trail-blazers for new models of services, advocating for social, economic and political justice for Californians who turn to the public mental health system for help. 

Join Chad Costello, Director of Public Policy for CASRA as he interviews Betty Dahlquist about her perspective on the evolution of the recovery movement in California through her CASRA lens and personal experience.  And in doing so, see how she challenges the myths which surround the deinstitutionalization movement and its role, or lack thereof, in creating the current crises of incarceration, homeless and economic inequality.

(Please be advised there are no CEU's for this session.)

View Syllabus

Participants will learn about the history of the psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery movement from the lens of CASRA's Executive Director, Betty Dahlquist.

0

The Recovery Journey through Medical Necessity
(10:15 AM - 12:30 PM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Maria Gregg, LCSW, Therapist.

Amanda Vierra, LAADC, Health and Wellness Manager, Trainer and Consultant.

This workshop will assist practitioners in how to document medical necessity in a non-stigmatizing way as they serve individuals with persistent, chronic mental illness. Practitioners will view documentation as an extension of care and a tool to inform how to best engage individuals in their recovery journey.

View Syllabus

The Recovery Journey through Medical Necessity training supports the collaboration of documentation and good clinical care and services. It taps into years of outcomes research supporting the clinical relationship driving positive client outcomes. Current practice reinforces a “myth” of specific language needing to be in our documentation, which is often negative about the client’s experience and can impact their recovery. This training intends to address the myth of “Medi-Cal Language” and help trainees simplify their documentation, while also meeting the real requirements. This workshop will assist practitioners in how to document medical necessity in a non-stigmatizing way as they serve individuals who have serious mental health challenges. Practitioners will view documentation as an extension of care and a tool to inform how to best engage individuals in their recovery journey.

  • Understanding Medi-Cal requirements as the framework to use strengths-based language to document treatment and service engagement.
  • Shift towards documentation as an extension of person-centered care.
  • Increased awareness of how language used in documentation impacts engagement with the individuals we serve.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two reasons why documentation impacts engagement.
  • Cite two ways in which developing strength-based progress notes can help to create meaningful interventions.
  • Identify two ways that practitioners can translate traditional language to recovery-oriented language, especially in the use of trans-theoretical model.

2

Top Go Top

May 06, 2021

Title Speaker Description Goals CEU

Understanding Loneliness & Social Isolation: Impacts on People and Society at Large in a Connected World
(09:00 AM - 10:00 AM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Robert Statham, BS, Training & Technical Assistance Facilitator, NYAPRS.

As understanding of the Social Determinants of Health and Mental Health builds, it becomes critical to focus our attention on how health and mental health is largely influenced by social factors. While having meaningful relationships is vital to human beings’ ability to thrive, emerging data is uncovering an epidemic of loneliness throughout society. As awareness around social isolation and loneliness increases, we are learning about the impacts on society at large as well as individuals with behavioral health issues. To address this issue and assist people on their recovery journey, we must begin examining the multitude of impacts of loneliness in order to help people develop meaningful connections that heal.

View Syllabus

This training will direct participants attention on how physical health and mental health is largely influenced by social factors. Each participant will learn how the epidemic of loneliness & social isolation affects people with mental health challenges and learn strategies and techniques to assist people with mental health challenges build positive relationships with others.

  1. By the end of the training, participants will recognize the prevalence of social isolation and loneliness in society, focusing on the significance for individuals with mental health conditions
  2. By the end of the training, participants will recognize the impacts of social isolation and loneliness on multiple aspects of individuals’ wellbeing
  3. By the end of the training, participants will be able to Identify strategies for assisting individuals to reduce loneliness by cultivating meaningful social relationships

1

Trauma and PTSD in People Diagnosed with Serious Mental Health Issues
(10:15 AM - 11:15 AM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Kim T. Mueser, PhD, Researcher, Boston University.

This workshop will begin with definitions of “trauma” and “posttraumatic stress disorder” (PTSD), followed by a review of the prevalence of traumatic events  and PTSD in people who have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Clinical approaches to the treatment of PTSD in people with SMI will next be described, with the primary emphasis on cognitive behavioral therapy, followed by research on the effectiveness of intervention.

The psychologically traumatic effects of psychotic symptoms and treatment experiences (e.g., involuntary hospitalization) will then be addressed, as well as research documenting PTSD symptoms secondary to those experiences. Last, treatment methods targeting PTSD secondary to psychotic symptoms and treatment experiences will be detailed.

View Syllabus

The goals of this workshop are to improve clinician’s ability to recognize and assess traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in persons with serious mental illness, including traumatic reactions to psychotic symptoms and treatment experiences, and to improve their knowledge of effective treatment approaches to PTSD in this population.

  1. By the end of the training, participants will be able to summarize the prevalence of PTSD secondary to life time traumatic events (such as sexual abuse/assault, physical abuse/assault, witnessing violence, accidents, etc.) in people with serious mental illness.
  2. By the end of the training, participants will be able to identify at least three treatment components of the cognitive behavioral therapy program for people with serious mental illness and PTSD.
  3. By the end of the training, participants will be able to summarize the prevalence of PTSD secondary to psychotic symptoms or treatment experiences.
  4. By the end of the training, participants will be able to describe at least one treatment approach to addressing PTSD secondary to psychotic symptoms or treatment experiences.

1

The Thinking Skills for Work: Cognitive Enhancement for Successful Employment
(11:30 AM - 12:30 PM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Susan McGurk, PhD, Professor, OT and Psychological and Brain Sciences.

The Thinking Skills for Work program combines computerized practice of cognitive skills and cognitive self-management strategies to help people diagnosed with serious mental health issues to enhance their thinking skills and use them to their full advantage in getting and keeping work. In this presentation , Dr. McGurk will provide a brief overview of the components of this program, evidence supporting its beneficial effects on cognition and work, and clinical vignettes illustrating particular strategies, and participant experiences in the program.

View Syllabus

Participants will learn about Thinking Skills for Work, a multicomponent cognitive enhancement program designed to optimize work functioning in people with serious mental illnesses

  1. Articlate two reasons why cognition is important for work  
  2. Identify at least two cognitive self management strategies, for example, to help people plan ahead,  optimize their self-confidence and organize their work day   

1

Top Go Top

May 12, 2021

Title Speaker Description Goals CEU

I Was There, So Are You
(09:00 AM - 10:00 AM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Harvey Rosenthal, Chief Executive Officer, New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services.

Harvey’s story reflects the past 40 years when the Recovery, Rehabilitation and Rights movements took hold in public mental health.  Join us as Harvey describes the journey and encourages people to look at where they are now and where we can move ahead.

(Please be advised there are no CEU's for this session)

View Syllabus

Participants will experience the history of the key ideas, people and legislation that has shaped the Rehabilitation and Recovery Movements.

0

A Rebellious Guide to Psychosis
(10:15 AM - 11:15 AM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Mark Ragins, MD, Psychiatrist, CSU Long Beach, Trainer and Consultant.

For too long, our approach to ongoing psychosis is to describe it as hopeless, incomprehensible, unrelatable, and frightening. We need to rebel against these perspectives to appreciate psychosis as a relatively common response when someone has serious difficulty in all three dimensions of a “psychosis triangle”: experiencing reality, self-identity, and relationships. Many “strange facts” about psychosis make sense when we take off our narrow-minded blinders and look at all three interacting dimensions in someone’s life. Using a truly person-centered biopsychosocial approach, instead of an illness-centered approach, we can understand the journeys people are going through, we can relate to them and travel with them, we can make collaborative recovery plans (often including using medications more effectively), we can avoid chronicity and disability, and it’s likely we can even prevent a good deal of psychosis from emerging in the first place. We’ve had enough expensive focus on brain scans and genetics. Let’s really listen to people and let our experiences together guide us.

View Syllabus

Participants will be disabused of four common barriers to working with recovery with psychosis and be open to a comprehensive, holistic, model of psychosis that encompasses a variety of hopeful, effective services and supports.

  1. Participants will be able to recognize and contradict four common responses to psychosis (fear, hopelessness, incomprehensibility, and personally unconnectable)
  2. Participants will be able to describe a 3-dimensional model of psychosis (experiencing reality, self-identity, and relationships and use it to describe individuals experiencing psychosis and their recovery
  3. Participants will be able to use this 3-dimnsional model to evaluate the need for and effectiveness of various support and service approaches for individuals with psychosis

1

From Hardship to Hope: Strategies to Foster Financial Wellness in Times of Uncertainty
(11:30 AM - 12:30 PM)
Pacific Time (GMT-8)

Oscar Jimenez-Solomon, MPH, Research Scientist, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University.

More info soon!

1

Top Go Top